Tag: Gamers

SKL | League 2017 Fall Season

The time has come yet again! The 2017 SKL League of Legends Fall Season is upon us, and registration is now OPEN!

For those who don’t know, SKL-LoL is a seven week League of Legends league that pits amateur teams against each-other in a highly competitive atmosphere. Every game of the regular season is streamed and cast live on Twitch.tv with the top four teams invited to a live finals event in Saskatchewan! The winners take home a cash prize and the title of Champions.

For ALL the details check out the registration page here.

Join the Client Alpha!

Earlier in the season, Riot announced that they would be updating the League of Legends client by re-building it from the ground up. The client has been updated various times in the past, but the team was very limited. With this brand new client, Riot will now be able to build exactly what they want without any limitations of the past; what’s more is that they will now be able to deliver future features to the client much easier, thus giving us updates much faster than before.
It has been a while since announcing this feature, and we finally have an update: we have all been invited to sign up for the alpha. Riot has never opened up a feature to us this early ever before, so the purpose of the alpha is for us to break the new client in as many ways as we can to ensure that it is flawless when the time comes to bring it to live. But you better hurry: there are only a limited number of spots available in the alpha, so if you want to help test it, you should sign up right away. But what exactly is new to the client? Well, let’s find out!

New Champion Select
The new champion select beautifully matches the new style of the client – which has a Hextech inspiration. Though the new champion select has already been implemented into the current client through ranked queues, it is now being added to every game mode and is worth noting to give you a feel of what the new client will look like throughout. It has a clean design, and is much more user friendly than the old client, which was due for some change. But not only is the last screen you see before entering a game being completely re-hauled, but also the first screen you see when coming out of your game: The game overview screen. Now with a much more eye friendly design, the game’s statistics are laid out as beautifully as the rest of the client.

en_US_friends

Pop Out Chat Window
The pop out chat window being implemented into the new client is a great idea. Riot had recently created a chat app for smart phones, but they definitely needed one for desktop as well. Now without even having the full League of Legends client open, you may talk to your friends and see what they are doing in the game. If while talking to a friend you decide to start playing the game, it is as easy as clicking a button inside of this chat window and you are now in queue for a game without even having the full client open. This was a great move from Riot, as I always have my client open even while not playing in case a friend messages me. Now if only there were a way to merge this with Battle.net and other standalone game chats so that we only need one program open to talk to all of our friends, but I guess Curse Voice will do in that respect for now.

Overall, League of Legends was definitely in need of this brand new client. Now with a much cleaner design, as well as a lot of flexibility for future updates, both we and the Riot team will have a greater time and experience.
Are you interested in joining the Alpha to try out these new features, as well as any other features that you will find out about ahead of anyone else? Go sign up now before Riot runs out of room!

The Draft

Hello! My name is DXI Edge and I’m the current Coach/Analyst for Team Malicious Intent. My role on the team is focusing on optimizing item builds, drafts, macro play adjustments, watching VODs from pro play and seeing how we can translate that into our games, as well as finding possible champion picks that are underrated.

 

One of the major aspects of League of Legends, especially in team play, is the draft. Just to give a brief rundown of what I mean, the draft is the pick and ban phase at the beginning of the game, and how each team approaches this strategy. In my opinion, it doesn’t matter how good a team is. If you do not draft properly, (according to the meta and according to an unwritten set of “rules” which I will get into) your team will lose. It is just that simple. If you can outdraft your opponent, you can set yourself up for success in the game at minute zero, and put yourself at a significant advantage.

 

The set of rules I mentioned earlier assumes a few things:

  1. There is a clear “meta”
  2. Members of the team CAN play almost all of the “power picks” in the meta

 

Very rarely does the first rule ever not happen, since due to pro play and analysts (aka, people like me), clear “best” champions or strategies are identified. Due to League of Legends being as old and popular as it is, it is very easy to watch what works and what doesn’t, and base strategies for teams based on this information.

 

NOW. What are these rules? I’m going to be going over these one by one in articles over the next few months, but we’re going to start with the most important rule in my opinion.

 

Your comp must have wave-clear.

 

Before I go in depth on how to draft wave-clear, what is wave-clear? Wave-clear is the ability for a wave of minions to be killed (or cleared) quickly and effectively. This can be done either by one skill, or a couple of skills with low cooldown/mana costs. I DO NOT CLASSIFY ULTIMATES AS WAVE-CLEAR and this is an important aspect to mention for one of the champions in the “meta” right now.

 

Why is wave-clear so important? Simple: turrets are the single easiest way to collect large sums of gold for your team, and having a turret up effectively says “This area of the map belongs to us”. Keeping your turrets alive while destroying the enemies’ turrets is the basic component of this game, and is the base of which this game was built on. So what does wave-clear have to do with turrets?

 

When you are looking to take turrets, you want your minion wave to get to the tower as fast as possible to remove the Armor/MR buff from towers, as well as have the minions tank the damage while you destroy the tower.

 

When you are looking to defend turrets, you want your opponents’ minion wave to be eliminated as fast as possible to add the Armor/MR buff for your towers, as well as have the enemy champions take damage from your tower.

 

There are two levels of wave-clear for a draft: S tier and A tier. Your composition for a draft should have NO LOWER than two points, but the most optimal number is three points. If you have two points, there needs to be a champion included in your composition that can use an ultimate for wave-clear (ex: Ryze) or has pseudo-wave clear in their kit (ex: Kalista). However, for optimal drafts the number should be three.

 

Now that we know why wave clear is important, let’s take a look at what I believe are the best champions for wave-clear in the meta as of now (Patch 6.6 and 6.7).

 

S Tier (2 points):

Mid: Azir, Lissandra, Lulu, Lux, Varus

ADC: Sivir, Jhin

 

A Tier (1 point):

Top: Gangplank, Ekko, Graves

Jungle: Graves

Mid: Twisted Fate, Zilean, Orianna, Corki

ADC: Lucian, Corki, Caitlyn

 

Lets start with S Tier. Why are these champions in S Tier? These champions can clear waves with two skills typically, on relatively low cooldown. Another major aspect, however, is their role. All champions in S Tier are mid/ADC. Why is this? Very rarely do you have mid laners or ADCs split push. Most of the time you will have your ADC and mid laner together, or be collecting waves with your team to approach a split pusher. Seven champions are the bread and butter of destroying waves quickly, and when it comes to the tier list of power picks in the current meta, these champions are at the top of the “power picks”, due in part to their ability to clear waves.

 

For Azir, it isn’t so much his skills as much as his ability to place soldiers down and attack them from such a distance that he is safe.

 

Lissandra can Q waves on very quick cooldown, or even use her E (although not recommended) to clear waves. Lulu can use 2 quick Qs, Lux can bind the first two melee minions and then throw her E down, and Varus can use Qs or even his E.

 

For ADCs, Sivir is the queen of wave-clear. Turn on bouncing blade, throw a Q, and the wave disappears. For Jhin, using his traps, his W, or his Q can clear waves effectively as well. Although he is not as effective as Sivir, he gets the job done.

 

In my opinion, one S tier champion is the same as having two A tier champions. If you have one S tier champion and one A tier champion in your comp, your draft has the appropriate amount of wave-clear.

 

Now let;s look at A tier. A tier differs immediately from S tier due to the inclusion of tops and junglers. Although tops and junglers may have as strong wave clear as those in S tier (Graves, for example), due to junglers having to roam/flank and top laners needing to use teleport appropriately, these champions cannot be S tier and cannot be the fundamental wave clear of a team comp.

 

Gangplank, Ekko, and Graves all want to teamfight and split push, so they can use TP on cooldown. They can push waves very quickly (Gangplank barrels, Graves/Ekko Qs) and are good duelists and teamfighters. Gangplank is also very proficient in that he can use his ultimate anywhere on the map to help clear a wave.

 

Graves as a jungler is, in my opinion, the best jungler in the game right now. Although Kindred/Nidalee/Graves are the top three, Graves gets the edge as number one for me due to his flexibility and his spot in A tier for waveclear. His Q and autos are both AoE and can clear waves quickly.

 

Zilean, Orianna, and Corki are all good wave clearers, however they aren’t AS strong as S tier champions. Zilean wants to use his bombs for stuns and as such it’s not optimal to use them as waveclear. Orianna needs to be a little bit closer and wants to place her ball in specific positions due to her ultimate, so she loses a point. Corki cannot insta-clear waves and has to use a lot of his rockets for clearing waves, so he cannot be in S-tier.

 

Twisted Fate, although has the wave clear of an S tier champion, wants to use his ultimate for flanking and wants to split push. So although the wave-clear is S tier status, the champion wants to be played as a split pusher, so he loses a point.

 

Lastly, Lucian has very short range. Although his Q and double-tap can clear waves effectively, his ultimate is what his “defining” wave-clear skill is, and as such cannot be placed in S tier.

 

 

Now that we know the defining champions in the current meta, let’s take a look at some example drafts from both pro play and SKL, and see if we can predict the result of the game based purely on wave-clear. We are going to examine drafts done where one team drafts less than three points of wave-clear based on my scoring system compared to one team that does, and see if the wave-clear team won.

 

 

 

 

 

H2K vs Fnatic  – 3rd place match

Games 1 / 2 (same drafts)

H2K:                            Fnatic:

Maokai                        Ekko

Kindred                      Graves

Ryze                            Azir

Kalista                         Ezreal

Thresh                        Trundle

0 points                      4 points

Predicted winner: Fnatic

Actual winner: Fnatic

 

Although this draft from H2K was called “very strong”, in my opinion this draft was horrible. They rely completely on snowballing and picks, with no way to out-siege/defend against Fnatic’s team comp.

 

H2K vs Fnatic  – 3rd place match

Game 3

H2K:                            Fnatic:

Maokai                        Gragas

Kindred                      Graves

Lissandra                   Kassadin

Corki                           Ezreal

Alistar                         Braum

3 points                      1 point

Predicted winner: H2K

Actual winner: H2K

 

This was just an overall bad draft by Fnatic for a few reasons, but this article is solely looking at waveclear.

 

Jin Air vs SKT – Korean Playoffs

Game 3

JAG:                             SKT:

Gangplank                  Maokai

Graves                                    Kindred

Ryze                            Cassiopeia

Kalista                         Sivir

Alistar                         Tahm Kench

2 point                        2 points

Predicted winner: JAG

Actual winner: SKT

 

Here is where my system becomes not so foolproof, and I wanted to include this decision for a very specific reason.

 

Although the point system is tied, I have JAG as predicted winner. Why? The inclusions of Kalista and Ryze. These two champions, although not on either of my tier lists, are “tie-tippers”. These champions are just below A tier and as such, if I were to analyze this comp based purely on wave clear, I would predict JAG to win. However, Faker is a god and SKT pulled out the old school Ryze counter and won a perfect game.

 

KT vs SKT – Korean Playoffs

Game 2:

KT:                              SKT:

Maokai                        Trundle

Nidalee                       Elise

Corki                           Zilean

Kalista                         Sivir

Alistar                         Tahm Kench

1 point                        3 points

Predicted winner: SKT

Actual winner: SKT

 

 

Very strong picks from KT’s side, however they did not include enough wave-clear in their comp compared to SKT’s. I will say this though: Kalista does have some amounts of wave clear, however not enough to compensate for a one point draft. As I said earlier, a two point draft can be mitigated with a Kalista, not a one point draft.

 

FOTN vs TMI – SKLeague Week 6

Game 2:

FOTN:                         TMI:

Nautilus                      Trundle

Zac                              Gragas

Ahri                             Azir

Sivir                            Jhin

Alistar                         Morgana

2 points                      4 points

Predicted winner: TMI

Actual winner: TMI

 

Hey, this is one of my drafts! Our early pick included an S tier wave clear right off the bat in Jhin, setting us up for flexibility in the draft and only needing one more point. We follow it up with another S tier pick, while our opponents picked only two points of wave-clear.

 

 

 

 

 

RDS vs A53 – SKLeague Week 6

Game 2:

RDS:                            A53:

Irelia                           Malphite

Hecarim                      Gragas

Lulu                            Varus

Ezreal                         Corki

Alistar                         Braum

2 points                      3 points

Predicted winner: A53

Actual winner: A53

 

This game was looking to break my rule for a little while! However, the wave-clear allowed A53 to sit back, farm up, and catch up slowly while RDS could not push through.

 

Well, that’s it for today. I hope this helps the drafts of SKL and your dynamic queue games in the future! I’ll be back soon for the next rule: Engage.

URF 2016: Please NURF

Since the introduction of the rotating queue, many of us have been waiting for Ultra Rapid Fire’s return. Without its traditional April Fool’s Day start this year, we sat and waited until it finally came and quickly left the live servers over the weekend. Since its introduction in 2014, U.R.F. has changed quite a bit. With no idea it would become so popular, Riot unleashed its creation into the world without any restrictions. Lawnmower Hecarim quickly took over the Rift but was quickly disabled once his power was proven to be too great, along with other champions like Sona, Soraka, and Skarner (my favourite three to play in this game mode in 2014). Players simply revived and teleported around the map as they pleased until Revive was also disabled from this game mode (and soon after removed from the game in general). But with all of the nerfs and adjustments Riot has made since its original introduction, who were the best champions to play in Ultra Rapid Fire this year?

Fizz
Similar to Vladmir, Fizz is able to be un-targetable to enemies for a short time while also being mobile. The difference that brings Fizz onto this list and not Vladmir is that Fizz has much more mobility and damage with his Playful/Trickster combined with his Urchin Strike. There is no getting away from a Fizz in URF; once he spots you, you – and all of your teammates – are as good as dead.

Blitzcrank
If you thought Blitzcrank was annoying in a normal game, just wait until you see him in an Ultra Rapid Fire game. With his brief cooldowns he will constantly be spamming his Q, so avoiding his pulls will be your top priority. If you do happen to get hit by his Rocket Grab, there’s not much you can do unless you have very good mobility. As soon as you reach him, Blitzcrank will be knocking you up with his E, and then pulling you in again with his Q, repeating this until he gets his kill. If you happen to get away from him, you better run because Blitzcrank is able to constantly spam his W, giving him a permanent speed boost. Once Blitzcrank hits level 6, his combo, which now will include Static Field, will kill you faster than you even have time to think about reacting.

Teemo
By far one of the most hated champions of League of Legends, Teemo just gets worse in Ultra Rapid Fire. If you thought his mushrooms were annoying in a normal game, then do not lane with Teemo in URF. You may think you’re winning to begin with, but as soon as Teemo hits level 6, you can guarantee that his lane is going to be covered in mushrooms. Thought you were going to gank him? Just kidding, you’re dead before he even notices you’re there.
Teemo’s shrooms aren’t the only annoying thing about him in URF either. If you’re playing a champion dependent on auto attacks, then you better stay clear away from Teemo, who can spam his Blind so that you can never hit him. You better be sure of yourself before going all in on a Teemo, because once you’re in, there is no turning back. There is a reason why Teemo was disabled in URF right from the start in 2014, and he hasn’t gotten much better.

Evelynn
Where’s Evelynn? Probably behind your team ready to assassinate your squishies just like in a normal game. The difference with Evelynn in URF however, is that her Q, Dark Frenzy can be spammed much faster, and without the worry of running out of mana. With one Dark Frenzy after the other and with her ultimate slowing her enemies while she spams her W to keep up and run away if need be, Evelynn is a must try in Ultra Rapid Fire. With her passive invisibility, Shadow Walk, there is no fight in which Evelynn does not choose to participate.

Karthus
Of course Karthus is going to be overpowered as soon as you take away the only two things holding him back: mana and the cooldown on his ultimate, Requiem. Spamming Karthus’ Q is already done normally, and that spam just gets worse in U.R.F. With no need to worry about mana, Karthus may activate his E without ever having to turn it off, so team fights with Karthus are a mess.
The most crucial part of why Karthus is so huge in Ultra Rapid Fire is his ultimate ability, Requiem. With 80% cooldown reduction, you will not want to be hanging around the map for too long with low health without either a lot of magic resist or a Zhonya’s Hourglass. Making this a must buy for all of Karthus’ opponents, this sets them back while they take time to build it. And if they decide not to build a Zhonya’s, all the more free kills for you.

Sona_5
Sona
Sona is one of my favourite champions in the game, so I immediately started playing her from my first game of U.R.F in 2014. I would choose Sona, while my friend would choose Soraka (back before her rework) who was arguably even more annoying than Sona. Though she can get boring very quickly in U.R.F, Sona is a definite win in U.R.F as long as the other team does not have one too. Personally, I do not like to play her because of the unfair advantage she has, but I WILL play her if she is not banned just so we do not get dominated by the other team’s Sona.
Not even having to aim your heal or damage ability (much like Evelynn’s Q), Sona is one of the easiest champions to play in Ultra Rapid Fire. As long as you know how to continuously spam your Q and W you are good to go. If you find yourself in a tight spot, quicky ult your opponents and start spamming your E. You are sure to escape if you don’t kill them with your unlimited Q spam first.

Shaco
Defintely one of URF’s most dominant champions, Shaco was no different this year. Going full ability power, Shaco is able to quickly kill you before you have any time to react. Shaco’s Q, Deceive quickly gets him around the map without being seen, and once he pops out, a dagger will accompany him, most of the time dealing more than half of your health (depending who you are playing) with a single shot, and if there are no teammates around to assist you, you can guarantee that he will be back with another dagger a split second later.
Shaco’s Deceive and Two-Shiv Poison (E) aren’t the only things you have to worry about either. Shaco is able to place down his Jack In the Boxes one right after the other, so watch where you step, or you will quickly be dead without the need of Shaco being there at all.

Zed
Taking the title of Lawnmower from Hecarim, who was rarely seen in U.R.F this year, Zed is one of the most terrifying champions to play against in this game mode. With his low cooldowns, all of his abilities may be spammed easily and will kill you at alarming speeds. Zed’s W gives him crazy mobility, allowing him to pop under a turret, take you (and perhaps a couple of your teammates) out, and be out of there before you even notice. Zed’s poke alone is enough to make you change lanes in frustration, as he is able to constantly poke you down easily with only his clone’s attacks. Zed is definitely a must ban or play in Ultra Rapid Fire. Choose which of the two you do wisely.

These are the champions that I found to be best in Ultra Rapid Fire this year. Though you will probably agree with me that these champions are among the best, are there others that you would add, or even put above these characters on an annoyance and overpower scale? We know that there are way too many of these to list in just one article and would love to hear some of your U.R.F. horror tales.

The Overwatch Overview

Blizzard seems to be popping out games into every genre lately. With their MOBA, Heroes of the Storm; TCG, Hearthstone; MMORPG, World of Warcraft; RTS, Starcraft; and their ARPG, Diablo, the company reaches out to audiences of almost every type of game. And as you probably already know, Blizzard Entertainment is not too far off from releasing their very first FPS, Overwatch. But what is Overwatch? Is it worth buying, or is it just like any other shooter? Is Blizzard just trying too hard to reach into all of these different genres? I decided to try the beta this past weekend to find out.

Game Modes
Overwatch is an online First Person Shooter game with four team based objective games: Escort, Assault, Hybrid, and Control. In all of these games except Control, your team is placed on either the defender or attacker side of the map, but all of these game modes have quite a different feel to them.
-Escort: In this game mode, you are either preventing a payload from reaching its delivery point, or you are trying your best to move the payload to said point. You and your four teammates must continuously alter your strategies throughout the game as the payload passes through different strategic points throughout the map. The game ends when either the attackers reach their target location, or the defenders prevent the payload from reaching its target for the game’s set time.
-Assault: In Assault, depending on the side of the map your team has been placed, your goal is to either defend specified areas on the map until the time runs out, or to capture those point on the map within that time. To capture objectives, you must clear the defenders of the objective areas as the objective timer fills.
Hybrid: Hybrid does not need much of an explanation. So far, the only hybrid game released has been a combination of Escort and Assault, in which the game starts with an Assault and ends with an Escort.
Control: In control, your team is not placed on an attacking or defending side of the map. Instead, both teams fight over control over an objective in the centre of the map. While in control of the map’s objective, your team makes progress towards capturing it. Whichever team reaches 100% on the objective first wins the round. This game mode consists of a maximum of three rounds, with a different map and objective each time, the best team out of three games wins.
BONUS: Blizzard has also recently taken an idea from their Trading Card Game, Hearthstone, in which each week there is different featured game mode in their Weekly Brawl. Like Hearthstone’s Tavern Brawl, the Weekly Brawl will consist of completely different rules each week. In one week’s Brawl, you may only be able to play as McCree (one of the game’s offense characters) and the next, you may be able to play any character, but that character may be randomly selected for you every time you respawn. This past week’s Weekly Brawl that I was able to play in the beta was very similar to League of Legends’ Ultra Rapid Fire (URF) game mode, in which the games were very fast paced due to cooldowns being reduced drastically. As a first time Overwatch player, I played this game for the first time not even knowing what I was getting into, and halfway through the match when I finally realized what was happening, I was both embarrassed and overjoyed!

overwatch___tracer_wallpaper_by_mikoyanx-d8t8ofg
Characters and Roles
Overwatch currently has a total of 21 different heroes to choose from – that’s right “heroes”, not “classes” – and these heroes are divided into four categories: Tank, Defense, Offense, and Support. Each of these roles helps your team differently in winning your game and every hero feels completely different. No sniper feels like the other and no damage dealer deals their damage in the same way. Each and every different playstyle is being accounted for! When first starting up the game, I recommend you try each and every character out before you stick to maining just one of them. I, for instance, immediately started playing McCree after having a couple of good games with him. I had lots of fun, and felt very powerful so he was my go-to-guy. But upon exploring other characters like Soldier: 76, Roadhog, and Bastion and loving them, I found that exploring each and every character was the best way to go. You should at least find one hero per role so that you can fill in different roles as needed – and the game does a great job at telling your team which roles still need to be filled. Keep in mind that you can change characters throughout the game when you respawn, so you don’t have to stick to one character the whole time if you don’t like them!

Cosmetic Items

Ah, cosmetic items: the completionist’s worst enemy. Overwatch is full of cosmetic items for you to collect – for a price. There are tons of victory poses, player icons, highlight intros, emotes, sprays, voice lines, and yes, skins All of these cosmetics are available for a set price, but are luckily also available through loot boxes: a box of four random cosmetic items that you obtain for leveling up. These are very exciting and I usually leave the lobby as soon as I level up just to see what I got. If you not sure exactly what each of the cosmetic items listed is, here is an explanation:
Victory Poses: When you win a game in Overwatch, your team is gathered in one picture and when you unlock a victory pose for a hero, this is the pose they will be in, in this picture.
Player Icons: In the main menu, you are recognizable by not only your Battletag ID, but a small portrait beside your name. Player icons range from Warcraft, Starcraft, and other Blizzard game themed to Tracer, Reaper, and other Overwatch character themes.
Highlight Intros: At the end of every game, there is a play of the game. If your play makes the play of the game, whichever Highlight Intro you have chosen, it will play before the play of the game plays.
Emotes: Emotes are short animations your character can play in game to taunt your opponent, or show off to your friends.
Sprays: I found sprays to be especially interesting. Sprays allow you to tag a picture onto walls, and not much else. Other players see these tags and can also cover them up with their own sprays. It’s just a cool and unique cosmetic that I wasn’t expecting.
Voice Lines: In the game, you may press the ‘C’ key to bring up a list of in game commands you can use to quickly tell your opponents what’s up. You may use this to say hello, or ask for assistance, but you can also choose the ‘voice line’ option, and you will say a line unique to that hero.
Skins: Skins are exactly what you would expect. They can change the colour of your hero’s clothes, or they can change what your hero looks like completely. The more expensive or rare the skin is, the more it will change your character.

When I first started playing Overwatch, I noticed I was losing quite a few matches. But then I realized that I was probably playing with people that had been playing the beta for much longer than me, and I eventually caught on and started winning more. The game is very fast paced and learning each individual hero and role takes a little bit of time, but once you do you fit right in and start having tons of fun. The controls are great and consistent throughout each hero, making each new character you try easy to learn. Blizzard has done a great job with their games of other genres, and they are doing just as well with their first FPS, Overwatch. It feels WAY different than any other FPS I have played and is not trying too hard at all. Blizzard is definitely just as serious about this game as any of their other type of game, and I’m sure this one will be just as big. This will definitely be one of the main games I start to play and I hope that the competitive scene catches on as well.

Do you plan to play Overwatch? Have you already? What are your thoughts?
Be sure to enter our contest to win your own copy of Overwatch when it releases!

A Look Back: Twisted Treeline

Most of us know and love Twisted Treeline as the small, two lane, two altar, seven monster jungle, 3v3 game-mode now on the live servers, but what some of you may not know is that Twisted Treeline – while always being a 3v3 map (and also supporting 6v6 in custom games) – started out much different. With a life span of three years (2009 to 2012) let’s take a moment to reminisce in what once was.

 

The original Twisted Treeline was released on October 17, 2009 as League of Legends’ second game mode. With a larger jungle than our current one, jungling was much more common than it is now, leaving the two lanes to be both 1v1. And though there were no altars in this large jungle, there was still much for teams to fight over:

  • Four camps of non-elite monsters for experience
  • Wolf/Green buff (Nature’s Fury: +20 attack speed and 10% cooldown reduction)
  • Banshee/Grey buff (Crest of Flowing Water: +45% movement speed)
  • Lizard/Red buff (Blessing of the Lizard Elder: Slows enemies and gives you damage based on level)
  • Dragon/Purple buff (Crest of Crushing Wrath: Every member of your team receives +1% damage per champion level to their basic attacks and abilities)

Yes, you’re reading right. There were once FOUR buffs to obtain in Twisted Treeline, giving you the possibility to be quadra-buffed; however, the monster buffs were not on a set timer, so you had to be lucky to come across them as they spawned.

twistedscreencap

Wards were also very much a thing in old Twisted Treeline, and with its thin, flashable walls and its bushes placed all throughout, they were a must if you wanted to avoid ganks. These walls were also perfect for junglers like Lee Sin, Shaco, and Malphite to jump over at their leisure, and since Lee Sin could also hop to his wards, he was a very unbalanced pick on this map.

In 2012, Riot announced a brand new version of Twisted Treeline in hopes to fix some of the balance issues. The goal of this new map was to have faster games by fixing the choke points around the inhibitor, which allowed for turtling. The jungle was also changed drastically. The top jungle was almost completely removed, leaving only the pit we know today as Vilemaw’s home. The jungle that was left was replaced with regular spawning camps and the Lizard Elder was replaced with two altars for each team to capture. The shop was also updated with various new items to support every role on this 3v3 map.

 

Twisted Treeline has changed a lot over the years. From a larger, unbalanced map with overall longer games, to a small, well balanced map with a focus on shorter games, I believe that Riot has done well in their decision to change the map. While the old map was also tons of fun, they have done well in designing their new one. As the game grows, things must be sacrificed and changed to ultimately make the game better as a whole.

Though I wholeheartedly believe the game has evolved for the better, I also hope to see the old Twisted Treeline in the game’s new Rotating Game Mode Queue as a featured game mode. Seeing this old map in the game again at least a couple times a year would be very refreshing. They could even possibly update the textures to match all the new ones. Are my hopes set a little too high here? Probably.

 

Did you like the old Twisted Treeline better than the new one? Do you hope to see it back as a featured game-mode? Do you have any old League of Legends memories you would like to share? Let us know in the comments and on our Facebook!

Introducing the SKL Community Hub

We at SKL are passionate about games. This is why we started this organization to begin with. We want a place that gamers from all walks of life can gather together, share stories, find new people to play with, and connect on a more lasting level. As such, we are excited to announce the launch of a Community Hub! This site is made by gamers, for gamers. Do you want to find people who play World of Warcraft in the province, or in your city? Or do you want to organize weekly scrimmage nights in Counter Strike? The Community Hub allows you to make groups, chat about games and eSports, and make new friends.

This site isn’t designed for SKL’s content; it’s an extension of WHY we are doing what we do. We want to support the gaming community in this province, and eventually, we hope, the nation. To us, the best way to do that is to connect gamers to other gamers.

Sign up now at community.skleague.ca! It’s free and always will be. Hit up some of the SKL team for a chat, dive into the forums, or organize local LAN parties. This is the place to find local, like minded individuals who share your passion.

GL;HF

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